Pipe erosion

Posted by & filed under Pipe Corrosion.

Like the aqueducts of old that were used to bring water into towns and early piping designed to reduce contagion by carrying effluent away from civilization, pipes have long provided a safe and convenient means of transporting liquids, gases, and even some solids. These days, pipes are many and varied, supplied for a variety of uses.

As such, there are many factors that could lead to pipe failure, and specifically, pipe erosion. It may depend on the piping materials and the contents moving through them. It could be related to environmental factors or whether or not proper pipe supports and wear pads were used.

In addition, erosion could occur both inside and outside of pipes. Regardless of the cause, however, no business wants to find itself dealing with the damage and cost that could result from pipe erosion. Here are a few potential causes you should be aware of and how you can prevent and treat them.

Pipe Materials

Certain materials may be more prone to erosion, especially when exposed to certain corrosive elements, or elements that create a chemical reaction. For example, certain metals are much more likely to suffer from rust when they come into contact with water or steam or if they are located outdoors.

Others may transport chemicals and undergo some type of erosion over time. It’s important to make sure that you select products, including pipes and pipe wear pads for example, that are designed to work properly in your environment and with the items being transported.

Heat

Some pipes will be subject to extreme temperatures as hot liquids, gases, or steam pass through, especially at high velocity. In such situations, it’s not uncommon to see erosion, particularly at joints where accelerated substances slam into a junction before rounding the bend and continuing forward. This scenario requires businesses to keep an eye out for wear and tear so that repair and replacement can occur before a fiasco develops.

Chemicals

Any number of chemicals can cause corrosion in and around pipes. Even something as seemingly innocuous as water can lead to chemical reactions with certain pipe materials or external elements like pipe shoes. Research is imperative to ensuring that you pair proper pipe materials with the substances that will come into contact with the pipes. Otherwise you could end up with corrosion, erosion, leaks, damages, and even injuries or fatalities.

Prevention

Your best efforts may not be enough to stave off pipe erosion completely. There are, however, steps you can take to prevent erosion, such as selecting appropriate pipes and looking for products that have been coated for additional protection.

Pipe corrosion protection tips

Posted by & filed under Pipe Corrosion.

All kinds of metals are used in pipes, but the two most common are steel and copper. Unfortunately, both of these types of metal can suffer from corrosion that eats away at the metal and ultimately leads to leaks.

Whether you’re dealing with residential, commercial, or industrial pipes and pipe supports, you want to do all you can to ensure that your infrastructure continues to function properly. Regular inspection and proper maintenance and repair are all a must, but what can you do to prevent pipe corrosion?

It will depend on whether you’re trying to prevent corrosion inside pipes or outside, as well as the type of metal you’re dealing with. Here are a few things you need to know about protecting your pipes against corrosion.

Corrosion Inside Pipes

Whether you have water, effluent, chemicals, or other substances coursing through your pipes, there’s a chance you could suffer corrosion inside piping networks over time. Even water, which seems harmless enough, could carry contaminants that result in corrosion, or the velocity at which it runs through pipes could cause damage over time. Stagnant water is also a concern if pipes aren’t used for extended periods of time.

There are a couple of things you can do to protect the interior of pipes. First and foremost, pipes must be properly coated with protective materials prior to installation. In addition, proper welding and soldering seams must be smooth so as to avoid “burrs” inside pipes that could speed corrosion. You must also use pipes regularly to avoid stagnant fluids.

There’s not a lot you can do after the fact to correct such issues, short of tearing the whole kit and caboodle apart and replacing corroded pipes. Preventive measures are essential to protect against corrosion inside pipes.

Corrosion Outside Pipes

You may have more opportunity to protect against corrosion on the outside of pipes, supposing they’re exposed and you have access. Again, prevention is your best bet. Pipes should be properly coated on the outside to avoid corrosion. You can also add elements like pipe wear pads or pipe saddles to prevent corrosion over time.

These extraneous measures work by bringing dissimilar metals (like steel and zinc, for example) into contact, which protects one metal (the steel pipe) while transferring corrosion to the other. These pipe shoes, saddles, cradles, pads, and so on can be added after the fact, as well, if corrosion on pipes becomes an issue. However, it’s always best to prevent costly and hazardous pipe corrosion from the get-go if you can.